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lflory @lflory
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @WayneDawsonEco:Identifying the role of soil microbes in plant invasions - Dawson - 2016 - Journal of Ecology - Wiley Online Library https://t.co/5AAsX3ZSyA 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @audubonsociety:Can scientists use parasitic flies to save Galapagos finches from parasitic flies? https://t.co/37V6dXIvR7 https://t.co/zfYPDaYB0U 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @BioprotectionNZ:Do associations with soil mutualists predict invasion success for clover? @TaShelby @JEcology https://t.co/h27sIckFiZ #Trifolium 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @DavidJohnGibson:Digging Deeper - How soil biota drive and respond to plant invasions @JEcology Special Feature @WayneDawsonEco 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @BrunaLab:TWO open rank positions in biodiversity science @UF. come join us! https://t.co/JUU2qXteLA 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @WayneDawsonEco:Our @JEcology Special Feature on soil microbes as drivers of plant invasion is online now: https://t.co/mYKBFO9yDZ 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @VToralgranda:to 25 years more of good scientific work for the conservation of #Galapagos - Cheers to that @DarwinFound https://t.co/qAXEi8Qiq5 
Luke Flory  @lflory
@drbarnes actually I was surprised 40-50 at our Future of Invasion Ecology symp. Prob many more if earlier in the wk but not bad for Fri AM 

Welcome

Research in the Flory Lab at the University of Florida covers a wide variety of topics in plant and ecosystem ecology with a focus on non-native plant invasions and agroecology.

Some of the primary questions we address include: “Which species are likely to become invasive and what habitats are susceptible to invasions?” “How do plant invasions impact communities and ecosystem processes?” and “How will plant invasion dynamics and interactions with native species change over the long-term?” Our recent NSF-funded projects have evaluated how the emergence and accumulation of pathogens might suppress an invasive grass (see Stricker et al., 2016, Ecology Letters) and where and how invasions might have the greatest ecosystem impacts.

Lab members are working on various basic and applied plant and ecosystem ecology questions in diverse systems including silvopastures in the Colombian Andes, managed grassland systems in south Florida, novel ecosystems in the Galapagos, pine forests in north Florida, and deciduous forests throughout the eastern US.

In general, our research group seeks to advance general ecological knowledge of plant communities and to answer applied questions that are relevant to natural areas management, restoration, and conservation.