Latest Tweets

lflory @lflory
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @LeeEvansDC:"Has the Cuba trade embargo outlived its usefulness? The answer is YES" @RepRickCrawford @Engage_Cuba #USACC https://t.co/kVpyTa5wmn 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @lars_brudvig:Seasonal tech openings: restoration effects on pollinators and pollination in longleaf pine savannas. Please RT https://t.co/jA4dwJ7myq 
Luke Flory  @lflory
@BrunaLab @edamschen Deal! Meet me at @fmbrewing tomorrow night 7:30 or so! 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @ESAinvasionecol:Call for Abstracts! Deadline: Thursday, February 25, 2015 #ESA2016 https://t.co/SiEG01Kh5y 
Luke Flory  @lflory
@edamschen seminar: larger patches = fewer extinctions; more fires = inc colonizations, dec extinctions, fewer non-native species (2/2) 
Luke Flory  @lflory
Excellent @UFWildlife seminar by @edamschen yesterday: patch area and fire history drive changes in sp composition over 5 decades. (1/2) 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @JAppliedEcology:Intense early invasive species surveillance can reduce mgmt costs compared to time-static monitoring @MattHHolden https://t.co/m9JCwJiw8V 
Luke Flory  @lflory
Good advice: Ten Top Tips for Reviewing Statistics: A Guide for Ecologists https://t.co/ev3xkTximk via @methodsecolevol 
Luke Flory  @lflory
RT @JackPayneIFAS:U.S. Eases Restrictions on Financing Exports to Cuba https://t.co/YFwkONcRjv 

Welcome

Research in the Flory Lab at the University of Florida covers a wide variety of topics in plant and ecosystem ecology with a strong focus on non-native plant invasions and agroecology.

Some of the primary questions we address include: “Which species are likely to become invasive and what habitats are susceptible to invasions?” “How do plant invasions impact communities and ecosystem processes?” and “How will plant invasion dynamics and interactions with native species change over the long-term?” In our current NSF-funded projects we are evaluating how the emergence and accumulation of novel pathogens might suppress an invasive grass and where and how invasions might have the greatest ecosystem impacts.

Lab members are working on various basic and applied plant and ecosystem ecology questions in diverse systems including silvopastures in the Colombian Andes, managed grassland systems in south Florida, novel ecosystems in the Galapagos, pine forests in north Florida, and deciduous forests throughout the eastern US.

In general, our research group seeks to advance general ecological knowledge of plant communities and to answer applied questions that are relevant to natural areas management, restoration, and conservation.